Cooking With Honey – Strawberries With Honey Rebecca Sauce

strawberries with rebecca sauce

This is a traditional Kentucky Derby favorite. Enjoy the seasonal abundance of fresh strawberries with this heavenly sauce.

Yield:  6 servings

Ingredients:

2 quarts fresh strawberries

· 1 pint sour cream

· ½ cup honey

· 1 tablespoon vanilla

· 1 tablespoon dark rum, brandy or bourbon (bourbon makes a more Kentucky-tasting sauce)

Directions:

Wash berries. Drain on paper towels. Divide among 6 pretty bowls or plates.

Combine sour cream, honey, vanilla and rum or bourbon. Stir to mix well. Spoon over strawberries and serve.

Run For The Roses

The Kentucky Derby is a stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, staged annually at Churchill Downs in Louisville, Kentucky on the first Saturday in May.

Organized horse racing in the State of Kentucky dates as far back as the late 1700s when several different race courses were built in and around the city of Louisville.

In 1872, Col. M. Lewis Clark, traveled to England, visiting the Epsom Derby, a famous race that had been running annually since 1780. From there, Clark went on to Paris, France, where in 1863 a group of racing enthusiasts had formed the French Jockey Club and had organized the Grand Prix de Paris, which eventually became the famous Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe.

Returning home to Kentucky, Clark organized the Louisville Jockey Club for the purpose of raising money to build quality racing facilities just outside of the city. The track would soon become known as Churchill Downs, named for Lewis Clark’s relatives, John and Henry Churchill, who had provided the land for the racetrack.

Besides the consumption of the Mint Julep drink, other traditions have played a large role in the Derby atmosphere, with elegant women appearing in long dresses, big hats, and carrying fancy umbrellas.

The Derby is frequently referred to as “The run for the roses,” because a garland of red roses is awarded to the Kentucky Derby winner each year.

Derby Week Recipes – Beef Tenderloin With Henry Bain Sauce

This is another beloved entree at Derby time. Leftovers are almost better than the main course!

Beef Tenderloin

· 2 to 2-1/2 pounds beef tenderloin
· 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried
· 2 teaspoons minced fresh garlic
· 1 teaspoon salt
· 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
· 1 or 2 tablespoons olive oil

Remove the meat from the refrigerator an hour before cooking.

Heat the oven to 500 degrees. Combine thyme, garlic, salt and pepper. Brush the meat with olive oil. Rub the seasoning mixture all over the meat. Place on a roasting pan, put the pan in the oven, shut the door and immediately reduce heat to 400 degrees.

Roast the beef 30 minutes and read its internal temperature. At 125 degrees, its center will be red and slightly warm. At 135, the center will be pink.

Remove from oven, drape loosely with a piece of foil and let the meat stand at least 10 minutes before trying to carve it. (Its internal temperature will rise a few degrees on standing.) Slice as desired for serving.

Serves at least 8.

Henry Bain Sauce.

Henry Bain sauce is a sweet-sour-spicy beef sauce invented by a maitre d’ at Louisville’s exclusive Pendennis Club in the early 20th century.

· 1 (17-ounce) jar Major Grey’s chutney
· 1/2 of 9-ounce jar imported pickled walnuts (optional)
· 1 (14-ounce) bottle ketchup
· 1 (11-ounce) bottle A-1 Steak Sauce
· 1 (10-ounce) bottle Worcestershire sauce
· 1 (12-ounce) bottle chili sauce
· Tabasco, to taste

Put the chutney and walnuts, if using, in a blender and chop fine or puree as you prefer (you’ll need to stop and stir). Combine with other ingredients and season to taste with Tabasco.

Makes 4 pints.

Serve with hot or cold roast beef. Spread on beef sandwiches, serve with pot roast, etc. Also good served with cream cheese as a cracker spread.

Derby Week Recipes – Garlic Cheese Grits And Spinach Souffle

cheese grits and spinach

I was raised on cheese grits casserole.  While I love the original, I also love this updated version!!

Ingredients:

1½ teaspoons plus 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
½ cup finely grated Parmesan
3 2/3 cups milk (not skim)
1 cup stone-ground or old-fashioned grits
Salt and black pepper
1½ cups grated sharp cheddar
1 clove garlic, minced
1 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
4 large eggs, separated, at room temperature
6 ounces baby spinach leaves (7½ cups loosely packed)
6 scallions thinly sliced (2/3 cup), 1 tablespoon reserved

Directions:

Grease a 2-quart souffle dish with 1½ teaspoons butter, dust with 3 tablespoons of the Parmesan, and set aside.

In a medium non-stick saucepan bring the milk and the 2 tablespoons of butter to a simmer over medium heat. Add the grits in a slow, steady stream, stirring constantly. Add 1 teaspoon salt, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook, stirring, until grits are thick and begin to pull away from the sides of the pan when you stir, 7 to 10 minutes.

Remove pan from heat and stir in 1¼ cups of the cheddar, the remaining Parmesan, garlic, hot pepper sauce, and black pepper to taste. Set aside to cool slightly, about 15 minutes. Taste the grits and adjust the seasoning, if necessary. Add the egg yolks one at a time, stirring vigorously to incorporate each before adding the next. Stir in the spinach by handfuls.

With an electric mixer, beat the egg whites until they are thick and glossy and hold stiff peaks. Add a quarter of the whites to the grits mixture and, using a spatula, stir until just combined. Add remaining whites and rapidly but gently fold them in along with the scallions.

Spoon the batter into the prepared dish, smooth, sprinkle with the remaining cheddar, and bake at 450 degrees for 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to 375 degrees and continue baking until the souffle is puffed, golden brown, and barely jiggles when you shake the pan, 35 to 40 minutes longer. Sprinkle with reserved scallions and serve at once.

Derby Week Recipes – Honey Bourbon Truffles

These are like old-fashioned bourbon balls, but updated with honey and English shortbread cookies.

Ingredients

3 (4-oz.) bittersweet chocolate baking bars, chopped
3 tablespoons honey
1 1/2 tablespoons cold butter, cubed
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
8  tablespoons heavy cream
1/4 cup bourbon
1 (5.3-oz.) package English pure butter shortbread cookies, crushed (such as Walkers Shortbread)
2 cups finely chopped roasted, salted pecans
Waxed paper
Preparation

1. Combine first 4 ingredients in a large glass bowl. Cook cream and bourbon in a small saucepan over medium heat 3 to 4 minutes or until mixture is hot but not boiling. (Mixture will steam, and bubbles will form around edge of pan.) Pour cream mixture over chocolate. Let stand 1 minute.
2. Stir chocolate mixture until melted and smooth. (If mixture doesn’t melt completely, microwave at HIGH 30 seconds.) Stir in crushed cookies. Cover and chill 3 hours or until firm. (Mixture can be prepared and chilled up to 2 days ahead.)
3. Shape mixture into 1-inch balls (about 2 tsp. per ball). Roll in chopped pecans. Place on waxed paper-lined baking sheets. Chill 1 hour. Store in an airtight container in refrigerator up to 5 days.

Derby Week Recipes – The Hot Brown

The Hot Brown was created at the Brown Hotel in Louisville in the early 1900’s by Chef Fred Schmidt.

It is especially popular during Derby week, although it is served year-round in restaurants throughout Kentucky.  This is the genuine recipe from the Brown Hotel.

Ingredients

4 oz. Butter
Flour to make a Roux (about 6 tablespoons)
3 – 3 ½ cups Milk
1 Beaten Egg
6 tablespoons Grated Parmesan Cheese
1 oz. Whipped Cream
Salt and Pepper to Taste
Slices of Roast Turkey
8-12 Slices of Toast (may be trimmed)
Extra Parmesan for Topping
8-12 Strips of Fried Bacon

Tomatoes for garnish

Directions

Melt butter and add enough flour to make a reasonably thick roux (enough to absorb all of the butter).

Add milk and Parmesan cheese.

Add egg to thicken sauce, but do not allow sauce to boil. Remove from heat.

Fold in whipped cream. Add salt and pepper to taste.

For each Hot Brown, place two slices of toast on a metal (or flameproof) dish. Cover the toast with a liberal amount of turkey. Pour a generous amount of sauce over the turkey and toast.

Sprinkle with additional Parmesan cheese. Place entire dish under a broiler until the sauce is speckled brown and bubbly. Remove from broiler, cross two pieces of bacon on top, add tomato slices and serve immediately.