Cooking With Honey – Mixed Greens With Honey Oregano Vinaigrette And Crispy Prosciutto

oregano salad

For the last two months I’ve been traveling the East Coast attending Bee Meetings and visiting adult children. It’s been lots of fun although I feel a bit like a long haul trucker. 🙂

I’ve visited the Biltmore Estate in North Carolina, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater in Pennsylvania, and the beehive/kitchen garden at the White House in Washington DC. I’ll be posting about my trips over the next few weeks.

Of course I’ve been eating and drinking along the way !! One of my favorite meals was at Nonna’s Italian in West Chester, Pennsylvania, where I had one of the best salads I’ve ever tasted. Not surprisingly, the original recipe calls for honey!!

Whether you make this salad as a prelude to a meal or for the meal itself, I guarantee you will enjoy it!!

Yield:  10 servings

Dressing:

2-3 cloves garlic, chopped fine

1/4 cup white wine vinegar

2-3 tablespoons fresh oregano leaves

1 teaspoon honey

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon black or red pepper, depending on your taste

3/4 cup olive oil

Directions:

Place all ingredients in lidded jar and shake until combined. Let stand for up to two hours for flavors to blend.

Crispy Prosciutto:

Twelve slices prosciutto.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Line two rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. Divide prosciutto between baking sheets, laying them flat. Bake until fat turns golden and meat is darker, about 15 minutes (rotating baking sheets from top to bottom halfway through baking time). Using tongs, carefully transfer prosciutto to paper towels to drain (it will crisp as it cools). Crispy prosciutto can be used like bacon, in whole pieces or crumbled.

Salad:

Twelve cups mixed greens

1 1/2 cups thinly sliced red onion, separated into rings

12 small/cherry tomatoes, sliced into quarters

1 tablespoon capers

1/4 cup sliced and pitted kalamata olives

12 slices crispy prosciutto, crumbled fine.

Directions:

Mix well and serve with Italian bread and olive oil.

Nothing Could Be Finer Than To Be In North Carolina In July!

On July 11-13 I had the great pleasure of attending the North Carolina State Beekeepers Association’s Summer Meeting in Pinehurst, NC!

North Carolina

Pinehurst is absolutely beautiful! Gracious Southern hospitality at its best…

Pinehurst-NC-Resort

I conducted two honey cooking workshops/cooking demonstrations in the Demo Kitchen of the Sandhills Community College. I felt like a food network star!  So much fun!!

Sandhills Community College

Sandhills Community College

Culinary Arts Department

Culinary Arts Department

I made one of my favorites, Honey Tiramisu!

Honey Tiramisu

I made enough for all of the 150 attendees to have a serving. I can now make Tiramisu in my sleep!

The NCSBA is one of the largest and most active beekeeping associations in the US.  It’s also one of the most hospitable!

I picked up lots of helpful information about beekeeping and enjoyed the company of other enthusiastic beekeepers.  I’ll definitely be a return visitor!!

“Bees And Beekeepers – A Sweet Life”

Carl White, Executive Producer and Host of the award-winning syndicated TV show Life in the Carolinas, was kind enough to send me the video of his recent show on North Carolina bees and beekeepers.

I really enjoyed it!  Did you know that North Carolina has more beekeepers than any other state? Or that North Carolina beekeepers like to compete to see who can light his or her smoker the fastest?  I was impressed!

Speaking of North Carolina, I’ll be conducting “Cooking with Honey” workshops at the North Carolina State Beekeepers Association Summer Meeting on July 11-13 in Pinehurst, North Carolina. Come by and visit me if you’re in the area!

Best Thanksgiving Leftovers – Brunswick Stew

Southerners love to debate the origins of Brunswick stew. Virginia,Georgia and North Carolina all claim to be its birthplace, but the truth most likely is that it originated with Native Americans. The first stews of early America contained all sorts of wild game, and folk history recounts that Brunswick stew was originally made with squirrel meat. The modern version is usually made with chicken, but leftover turkey is an ideal substitute.

Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

4 cups leftover turkey, diced

6 cups chicken or turkey stock

1 (16-ounce) can of tomatoes, drained, seeded, and chopped

2 cups fresh or frozen corn kernels

2 medium all-purpose potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch dice

1 large onion, thinly sliced

1 cup fresh or frozen lima beans

1 cup fresh or frozen sliced okra

1 teaspoon salt, or to taste

1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or to taste

1 teaspoon honey, or to taste

Directions:

Add the tomatoes, corn, potatoes, onions, lima beans, and okra to the stock. Season with the salt, pepper, and honey. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Reduce the heat to medium low and cook, stirring often, until the potatoes are tender, about 20 minutes.

Add the turkey to the vegetables and taste the stew for seasoning. Add more salt, pepper, or honey as desired. Cook an additional 15 to 20 minutes.  Serve hot in warm bowls.

The flavor of this stew is even better the next day!